Lebanon Reporter

Z_CNHI News Service

November 5, 2013

Changes to NCAA foul rules could lead to free-throw marathons

I attended a Big Ten basketball game in Bloomington, Ind., a few years ago where I was seated so close to the floor that I had to keep my feet pinned under my chair so I wouldn’t trip the referee as he raced up and down the court. The view from courtside left me with one shocking reaction: I no longer had any idea what was a foul.

There was banging, pushing, shoving, probably even tripping, but nary a whistle was blown by the officials. The disclaimer of “no-harm, no-foul” was truly enforced.  

Now as another basketball season begins to unfold this week, could all of that be about to change? This year we are being told to expect something much different from the game’s three-man officiating crews. A new no-hand check rule will be introduced and fouls will also be called on defenders who body-bump offensive players on their way to the hoop.

The idea behind these rule changes is to increase scoring and reduce the grind-it-out, rough-house style of play that had come to dominate in the major conferences. 

But that might not be the case. Instead of high-scoring, fast-breaking action, fans could just as easily be fed a diet of games where players repeatedly spend time on the free-throw line trying their hand at one-and-the bonus.

If games become a free-throw marathon, it could easily stretch them out another 20 minutes or more, causing interest and excitement to wane.

Some coaches think that the changes could re-introduce pure athleticism to the game. If so, that would be good for the 2013-14 season. There’s a wealth of talented freshmen coming into the college game this year. That would be especially true at Kentucky and Kansas.

John Calipari is expected to start four freshmen, but this will be anything but a rebuilding year. He’s even talking about the possibility of going 40-0 and winning another national championship. Undefeated might be a stretch – it hasn’t happened since 1976 -- but hanging another banner in Rupp Arena is a real possibility. 

UK will showcase Julius Randle, a 6-foot-9, 250-pound center, who averaged more than 32 points and 22 rebounds a game last year. He’ll be joined by six other McDonald’s All-Americans on the UK roster, which includes two returning starters. Finding enough minutes to keep everyone happy might be Calipari’s biggest challenge.

ESPN’s Chad Ford thinks seven Kentucky players could be taken in the first round of next spring’s NBA draft. Talk about depth.

The story is much the same at Kansas. Coach Bill Self persuaded three of the nation’s top recruits to come to Lawrence.  No player in America is rated higher than Andrew Wiggins, a 6-8 forward, who has been compared to LeBron James, the Ohio native who turned pro out of high school. Guard Wayne Selden and 7-0 center Joel Embiid, a native of Cameroon, make one wonder how Kansas could lose many games.

As much talk as there is about Kentucky, the Cats might not even be the best team in the state. In Louisville, many believe the Cardinals stand a good chance of defending their national championship. What distinguishes this team from others is that it is set to start two seniors and two juniors. 

Michigan State is also deep and talented. Coach Tom Izzo’s Spartans return four starters, including standout guards Keith Appling and Gary Harris. Plenty of other teams – such as Arizona, Michigan, Florida and Duke -- could fall into a long list of other legitimate NCAA favorites.

Offensive firepower will be plentiful this season. That said, what’s likely to determine next year’s NCAA champ is what team learns to play the best defense, especially if officials stick with their hands off, no touching approach to calling the game. 

Tom Lindley is a sports columnist for the CNHI News Service. Reach him at tlindley@cnhi.com

1
Text Only
Z_CNHI News Service
  • Lindley, Tom.jpg Is this a commercial for batting gloves or a baseball game?

    Major league baseball desperately needs to speed up the action. Here's a place to start: Nix the mind-numbing ritual of hitters who first adjust the right batting glove, then the left one, after every single pitch.
     

    August 21, 2014 1 Photo

  • The Simpsons still going strong

    The groundbreaking animation first hit the air Dec. 17, 1989, but the family first appeared on television in "The Tracey Ullman Show" short "Good Night" on April 19, 1987.

    August 21, 2014

  • Police chief resigns over racial slur repost to Facebook

    A repost on his personal Facebook page of a racially-charged comment by the original poster of a comedy video has forced the police chief of an Oklahoma city to resign his office.

    August 21, 2014

  • Does Twitter need a censor?

    Twitter decided last year to make images more prominent on its site. Now, the social network is finding itself caught between being an open forum and patrolling for inappropriate content.

    August 21, 2014

  • sleepchart.jpg America’s sleep-deprived cities

    Americans might run on sleep, but those living in the country's largest cities don't appear to run on much.

    August 20, 2014 1 Photo

  • Who should pay for your kids ACT?

    Thirteen states paid for 11th-grade students in all public high schools to take the ACT college admission test this year, with several more planning to join them in 2015.

    August 20, 2014

  • Pets.jpg Why do people look like their pets?

    As much as we might quibble over the virtues and vices of Canis domesticus, however, and over whether human nature is any better or worse than dog nature, even dog fanciers don't usually want to look like a dog.

    August 20, 2014 1 Photo

  • Lindley, Tom.jpg Another stumble begs questions about Notre Dame

    Notre Dame's vaunted reputation for formidable athletics and serious academics is again sullied by a cheating scandal. Maybe the high standards of the Fighting Irish are just too good to be true.

    August 19, 2014 1 Photo

  • Ice bucket challenge trending up

    Internet trends are a dime a dozen these days. Everything from Tebowing to planking to the cinnamon challenge can cause a wave of social media activity that can last for weeks before fizzling out.

    August 19, 2014

  • Five myths about presidential vacations

    In the nuclear age, presidents may have only minutes to make a decision that could affect the entire world. They don't so much leave the White House as they take a miniature version of it with them wherever they go.

    August 15, 2014

Featured items
Click below to browse and order photos


Photos from August 2014

Twitter Updates
Follow us on twitter
AP Video
Okla. Policeman Accused of Sex Assaults on Duty Raw: Egypt Bus Crash Kills at Least 33 Two Bodies Found in Adjacent Yards Dominican Republic Bans Miley Cyrus Concert Raw: Israeli Air Strike in Gaza Raw: Rescue Efforts Suspended at Japan Landslide Raw: Bodies of MH17 Victims Arrive in Malaysia Raw: Smaller Marches in Ferguson Marathon Suspect's Friend Pleads Guilty Attorney: Utah Eatery Had Other Chemical Burn Farm Resurgence Grows With Younger Crowd Microbrewery Chooses Special Can for Its Beer Ky. Firefighters Hurt in Ice Bucket Challenge Federal Investigation Will Look at Use of Force Community Deals With Michael Brown Aftermath US: We Do Not Pay Ransom to Terrorists Ferguson Teachers Training to Deal With Trauma Jon Hamm on the Unrest in Ferguson Tit for Tat? McDonald's Shuttered in Moscow Life on the Professional Video Game Circuit
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide